E-Waste

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Jul 2 - NC - E-waste Recycling Could Get Even Easier in North Carolina

A new bill may amend North Carolina's existing e-waste law to allow residents to dispose of their old computers  as part of the curbside program.

An amended electronic waste bill that only needs the governor's signature assigns shared responsibility for recycling electronics to manufacturers and local governments. Either manufacturers can shoulder most of the burden of recycling their products or they can pay for local governments to do more of the heavy lifting for them.

Electronics contain potentially harmful materials like mercury. Unlike other recyclables, computers can require disassembly and are made of numerous materials. In a February study, the N.C. Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance estimated that there were almost 70,000 tons of electronic waste ready for disposal in North Carolina in 2007.

Currently, the state e-waste law bans the disposal of televisions and computers starting next year. The law also requires manufacturers to create a recycling plan, register with the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources and pay annual fees, which are distributed to local governments for recycling programs.

The main difference with the amendment is that it allows computer companies to choose from different tiered recycle plans. The more intensive the plan, the less expensive the annual fee that the company has to pay. For example, a company with a plan that includes a mail-back option and at least one waste collection site pays a $15,000 annual fee, but a company with a plan that includes collection sites in 50 counties only pays a $2,500 fee.

The bill also pushes back the disposal ban from January to July of next year.

Read the article.

Jun 29 - NY - New York City's E-waste Lawsuit Officially Dismissed

The Natural Resources Defense Council reports the electronic industry has formally withdrawn its lawsuit challenging New York City's e-waste law.  On May 28, 2010,  Governor Paterson signed A11308, the NYS Electronic Equipment Recycling and Reuse Act, into law. The state e-waste law preempts NYC's law, effectively rendering the lawsuit moot.

The electronics and e-waste management industry protested NYC´s 2008 law, claiming it was too restrictive and placed an unfair burden on electronics producers.

The recently enacted state law establishes a producer responsibility system for end-of-life electronics, providing free e-waste recycling for consumers, schools, municipalities, small businesses, and small non-profits starting April 1st, 2011.

Jun 17 - PA - Pennsylvania E-waste Bill Advances to the Senate

HB 708 (Representative Ross), which would establish an extended producer responsibility-based recovery/take-back program for consumer computers and televisions, have passed the House and now goes to Senate Environmental Resources and Energy.

The bill also bans dumping these electronic devices in a landfill. In addition to protecting public health and the environment, this bill will create new green jobs for the collection and recycling of electronic devices.

Learn more about HB 708.

Take Action

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Take Action! Send a letter supporting HB 708.

Jun 15 - CT - Connecticut E-Waste Recycling Program Starts Implementation in the Fall

New regulations, recently approved by the Legislature’s Regulations Review Committee, now allow Connecticut's Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to move forward with setting up an e-waste recycling system, including the designation of collection points around the state. The new recycling system will keep certain leaded glass, mercury and other hazardous materials from entering the environment.

This statewide system for recycling "e-waste" – obsolete computers, monitors, televisions, printers and other electronic devices – could be in place for residents as early as this fall.

Costs to transport and recycle the equipment will be borne by manufacturers, who will be billed directly by the companies that the state selects to collect and haul the old devices. The new regulations stems from the e-waste law passed in 2007.

See the Press Release
Learn more about the Connecticut E-waste Law

New York E-Waste Law

On May 28, 2010,  Governor Paterson signed A11308, the NYS Electronic Equipment Recycling and Reuse Act, into law. This is a comprehensive e-waste bill that establishes free e-waste recycling for consumers, schools, municipalities, small businesses, and small non-profits, starting April 1st, 2011.

NY became the 23rd state to have an electronic recycling program.

This Act also preempt New York City's e-waste law, so the electronics industry's lawsuit against the City's takeback law is expected to be dismissed.

Details
This is a manufacturer-financed program for televisions, computer monitors, computers, computer peripherals, printers, and fax machines. There are strong collection standards set with this law.

Manufacturers must collect, recycle and reuse based on market share of electronic sales in New York, as determined by the Department of Environmental Conservation. Those who collect more waste than required can bank, trade or sell “recycling credits” for the excess waste they collect. Those who do not collect their share will face fines that will go toward state-run recycling programs.

Electronic manufacturers, collectors, recyclers, refurbishers, and retailers must register with the Department of Environmental Conservation.

Disposal Ban
Starting in April 2011, manufacturers will be prohibited from dumping e-waste in landfills. That same rule will go into effect for businesses, retailers, and local governments starting January 1, 2012. Then, starting January 1, 2015, consumers will be prohibited from disposal as well.

Covered Devices: 

Jun 2 - NY - Gov Paterson Makes New York the 23rd State with E-waste Recycling Act

On Friday May 28th, Governor Paterson signed A11308 into law, a comprehensive e-waste bill that establishes free e-waste recycling for consumers, schools, municipalities, small businesses, and small non-profits, starting April 1st, 2011. This is a manufacturer-financed program for televisions, computer monitors, computers, computer peripherals, printers, and fax machines. There are strong collection standards set with this law and enforces a disposal ban on the covered electronics, starting April 1, 2011.

Electronic manufacturers, collectors, recyclers, refurbishers, and retailers must register with the Department of Environmental Conservation.

NY became the 23rd state to have an electronic recycling program, despite opposition from business lobbies and Republicans legislators.

Because the law pre-empts the New York City e-waste law, the electronics industry's lawsuit against the City's takeback law is expected to be dismissed. 

Learn more about the bill.
Read an article.

South Carolina E-waste Law

South Carolina Governor Sanford signed House Bill 4093,  the Manufacturer Responsibility and Consumer Convenience Information Technology Equipment Collection and Recovery Act, on May 20, 2010. This Act establishes a statewide Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) program intended to recover electronic devices such as desktop and notebook computers, computer monitors, printers and televisions. This makes South Carolina the 22nd state to enact a program for the recovery of used electronics.

More than 53,800 tons of electronic waste was generated in state during the 2009 fiscal year. Unfortunately, only 1,756 tons (3.3 percent) of that amount were recovered for recycling, with the rest being incinerated or sent to landfill. This Act will reduce the number of electronic waste being sent to the landfill.

Details
Requires the manufacturer of computer and television products to offer an e-waste recovery and collection plan that is convenient to the consumer. Also requires manufacturers to educate consumers on said recycling program as well as the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is required to educate the consumer on recovery programs in the state. Processors must, at a minimum, comply with the standards established by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc.'s Responsible Recycling practices (R2/RIOS) certification program, or meet other comparable industry or governmental standards.

Disposal Ban
There will be a disposal ban of covered electronic devices starting July 2011.

Covered Devices: desktop and notebook computers, computer monitors, printers and televisions
View a copy of the final bill language.

Pennsylvania E-waste Campaign

 Pennsylvania E-waste Campaign: HB 708 and HB 409

HB 708 Covered Device Recycling Act

Summary: Establishes an extended producer responsibility-based recovery/take-back program for the following consumer electronic devices: computer monitors, desktop and notebook computers, and televisions.
Status: HB 708 was introduced in 2009 and carried over in 2010 legislative session. Referred to Environmental Resources and Energy on June 17, 2010. Amended and passed Senate committee 9/22. House concurred with Senate amendment 11/16. Governor Rendell just signed HB 708 into law, on Nov 23, 2010. This makes Pennsylvania the 24th state with an e-waste law.
Details: Manufacturers of covered products must register with Department of Environmental Protection of the Commonwealth and pay a registration fee of $5000, and renew annually thereafter. They must also establish, conduct and manage a plan to collect, transport and recycle their covered devices. Television manufacturers are responsible for their market share while computer manufacturers are responsible for return share. The recycling program is intended for consumers using covered devices for personal or home business use.
Sponsors: Representative Ross
C4R Contacts: Teresa Bui 916-551-1751

Take Action

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Oregon E-waste Law

Update: On June 29, 2011, Senate Bill 82 was signed into law. Beginning January 1, 2015, computer peripherals (keyboards and mice) and printers will be added to the Oregon E-Cycles Program.

The Governor signed HB 3606, which amends existing e-waste law to fix differing basis for TV manufacturer obligation inside default program and in separate manufacturer programs.

Background

Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski signed Oregon's e-waste bill HB 2626 on June 7, 2007. The e-waste recycling program is a statewide program that went into effect January 1, 2009. The program is financed by manufacturers, and provides responsible recycling of computers, monitors and TVs for households, small businesses, small nonprofits and anyone dropping off 7 items or less to collection points.

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality assigns all manufacturers a recycling obligation by May 1 each year. This obligation, or return share and return share by weight, is the percentage and weight, respectively, of computers, monitors and TVs that a manufacturer is responsible for recycling through a recycling program.

Numbers

Oregon's E-cycle Program collected 18.9 million pounds of materials in its first year. That equals out to more than five pounds of electronic waste per Oregonian. In 2010, Oregon collected more than 24.1 million pounds, or 6.31 pounds per capita.

Details

There are two types of recycling programs that manufacturers may participate in:

Virginia E-waste Law

Virginia Governor Kaine signed the Computer Recovery and Recycling Act (HB 344) on March 11, 2008. This producer responsibility bill requires manufacturers to set up a collection system for consumers to return computer equipment for recycling and reuse free of charge, effective July 1, 2009.

Details
The Act went into effect July 1, 2009. Each manufacturer must file its recovery plan with DEQ in order to continue to sell its products in Virginia after this date of the legislation. If a manufacturer's recovery plan is not in place (and on file with the Department of Environmental Quality) by this date, the manufacturer's computers can not be sold in the state. There is reporting requirement but not recycling goals set.

Disposal Ban
There is currently no disposal ban

Covered Devices: Desktops or notebook computer and maybe include computer monitor. Does not include televisions.
Read the final version of the law.
Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

Numbers:

In 2009, Virginia collected 3,782,500 pounds of e-waste for the 6 months that the program was in effect. In 2010, Virginia collected only 4,439,446 pounds of ewaste or .56 pounds per capita despite having a longer period of time for collection.

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